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Tag Archives: ISS

ISS and Glass Lewis publish 2015 voting policies

Posted in Corporate Governance, Uncategorized

Institutional Shareholder Services and Glass Lewis have issued their voting policies for the 2015 annual meeting season.  For the most part, both proxy advisory firms’ 2015 policies are refinements of those already in place.  However, companies should carefully review their 2015 annual meeting agendas against the updated policies to anticipate possible issues.  A summary of… Continue Reading

Game on: ISS and Glass Lewis issue 2015 voting policies

Posted in Bob's Upticks, Corporate Governance

Last week I posted an UpTick about the rollout of ISS’s voting policies for 2015.  This week saw what appears to be the completion of that rollout, and we were also blessed with the publication of Glass Lewis’s 2015 voting policies.

On a quick read, neither set of voting policies seems to contain anything shocking, but both sets continue the march towards what the proxy advisors see as shareholder democracy.  To paraphrase Jules Feiffer, I sympathize with their aspirations, but in some ways it looks like shareholder tyranny.  Both ISS and GL are adamant about two types of by-law amendments: those that make the loser pay in meritless lawsuits and those that arguably impact shareholder rights without getting shareholder approval.  ISS also tinkers with shareholder proposals on CEO/board chair separation.  GL is also concerned about by-law amendments and continues to rail against companies that don’t satisfactorily implement majority-approved shareholder proposals.  GL also continues to focus “material” transactions with directors.

I really do sympathize with at least some of the aspirations of ISS and GL.  However, their policies reinforce the notion – with which I’m not at all sympathetic – that shareholders have the right to second-guess each and every decision that the board makes.  For example, why does ISS think that shareholders are in a better position than the board to determine the board’s leadership structure?  And if the board has no business deciding on its own leadership structure, why give it the power to do anything at all?

We’ll be posting a more detailed analysis of the 2015 voting policies on The Securities Edge within the next few days.  For the time being, let us know what you think of them (or of my views).

 

Bob

Oops, they did it again – ISS proposes new voting policies

Posted in Bob's Upticks, Compensation, Corporate Governance

Britney Spears has nothing on Institutional Shareholder Services, better known as ISS.  ISS is rolling out proposed new voting policies for the 2015 proxy season.  ISS often uses more words to tout how transparent it is than to explain its voting policies clearly, and the draft policies being considered for 2015 are no different.

One new proposed policy addresses voting on shareholder proposals on independent board chairs.  ISS proposes to expand the list of factors that will be considered in developing a voting recommendation and to look at these factors in a more “holistic” manner.  (The current policy is to support the proposals unless the company meets all of the criteria.)  So this seems like a good thing.  However, ISS indicates that the new policy is not expected to change the percentage of independent chair proposals that it will support.  The obvious question is, then, how will the new policy really work?  Your guess is as good as mine (which frankly isn’t very good).

The other new proposed policy provides additional information regarding the “scorecard” that ISS will use to evaluate equity plans.  Like the independent chair policy above, some more criteria are laid out, but it’s impossible to tell how the factors – or, indeed, the new scorecard, will be weighed or will work – thus assuring that companies seeking shareholder approval of equity plans will have to continue to use ISS’s consulting service to find out whether a new plan will pass muster.

I could just as easily have referred to Yogi Berra as to Britney Spears, because if this isn’t déjá vu all over again, I don’t know what is.

Your thoughts?

Bob

10 nuggets on corporate governance hot topics

Posted in Corporate Governance

On September 30, Bob Lamm moderated a panel at a “Say-on-Pay Workshop” held during the 11th Annual Executive Compensation Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The Conference is an annual event sponsored by TheCorporateCounsel.net and CompensationStandards.com – and emceed by our good friend, Broc Romanek – and features many of the pre-eminent practitioners in corporate governance… Continue Reading

The shape of things to come in corporate governance

Posted in Corporate Governance

Interest in corporate governance has increased exponentially over the last several years, as has shareholder and governmental pressure – often successful – for companies to change how they are governed.  Since 2002, we’ve seen Sarbanes-Oxley, Dodd-Frank, higher and sometimes passing votes on a wide variety of shareholder proposals, and rapid growth in corporate efforts to… Continue Reading

Trying to save its own neck? ISS works to assure “data integrity”

Posted in Corporate Governance

On Thursday, Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. (ISS) announced the launch of a new data verification portal to be used for equity-based compensation plans that U.S. companies submit for approval by their shareholders.  This is a welcome change to ISS policy; although call me a cynic, but I believe this new policy has more to do… Continue Reading

Congress to the rescue?: Congressman hints at legislation to rein in proxy advisory firms

Posted in Corporate Governance

Who says Congress isn’t popular?  Well, Congress may become much more popular with public company executives if Congressman Patrick McHenry (R-NC) can make good on his recent promise to challenge the power of proxy advisory firms if the SEC doesn’t act.  In a recent keynote speech at an American Enterprise Institute conference on the role… Continue Reading

PCAOB proposal piling on more costs for public companies (again)

Posted in Accounting

The PCAOB’s recently proposed auditing standards aim to “provide investors and other financial statement users with potentially valuable information that investors have expressed interest in receiving but have not had access to in the past” by changing the standard auditor’s report and increasing the auditor’s responsibilities.  Sounds like a lofty goal, except that the information… Continue Reading

Recent meeting between the Society of Corporate Secretaries and Governance Professionals and SEC Staff provides insight

Posted in Disclosure Guidance

On Tuesday, the Securities Law Committee of the Society of Corporate Secretaries and Governance Professionals met with officials from the Divisions of Corporation Finance, Investment Management, and Trading and Markets and the Office of the Whistleblower.  While neither new Chair Mary Jo White (confirmed in April) nor new Director of Corporation Finance Keith Higgins (starts… Continue Reading

When does hedging or pledging of company stock by insiders equate to bribery?

Posted in Corporate Governance

The answer: when ISS is evaluating a public company’s corporate governance under its revised policies for the 2013 proxy season. We previously blogged about the potential insider trading issues that could theoretically arise when insiders pledge company stock to secure loans. Now, with the implementation of the revised ISS governance standards, there are additional reasons… Continue Reading

Are investors’ interests served by proxy advisory firms?

Posted in Corporate Governance

As we say “goodbye” to 2012 we say “hello” to another proxy season full of angst caused by the self-appointed czars of corporate governance, the proxy advisory firms.  Although ISS and Glass Lewis have been making voting recommendations for more than a decade, over the past two years their power over voting outcomes has increased. … Continue Reading

Binding say-on-pay: Is it coming to a public company near you?

Posted in Compensation

Following the recent financial crisis and government bailouts of major U.S. financial institutions, the federal government has gradually facilitated a power shift from companies and their officers and boards of directors to their shareholders. A prime example of this is the recently enacted “say-on-pay voting” requirements. Through provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act which was passed… Continue Reading