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Tag Archives: fiduciary duty

Uniform Fiduciary Standard for Broker-Dealers: An Update

Posted in Financial Institutions

As we blogged about last August, Section 913 of the Dodd-Frank Act directed the SEC to study the need for establishing a new, uniform, federal fiduciary standard of care for brokers and investment advisers providing personalized investment advice. Recall that, traditionally, broker-dealers and investment advisors are subject to different duties of care: a suitability standard… Continue Reading

Do forum selection clauses in bylaws make sense for companies not incorporated in Delaware?

Posted in Securities Litigation

More and more plaintiff lawyers are suing issuers outside of an issuer’s state of incorporation, which requires issuers to defend substantially identical claims in multiple forums at added expense with little to no benefit to the shareholders.  While plaintiff lawyers enjoy this lucrative source of revenue, the increasing amount of time and money expended on… Continue Reading

Protect your Board from merger and acquisition lawsuits with these five critical considerations

Posted in Mergers and Acquisitions

For a board of directors of a company, perhaps no decision is as important (and litigious) as the sale of the company in a change-of-control transaction. Shareholder lawsuits aimed at merger and acquisition (“M&A”) transactions (usually in the form of a putative shareholder class action or derivative suit) often allege that the directors of the… Continue Reading

It was me! SEC to toss “neither admit nor deny” policy in certain cases

Posted in SEC Enforcement

SEC Chair Mary Jo White has indicated that the SEC will require that, in certain cases, admissions be made as a condition of settling rather than permitting the defendant to “neither admit nor deny” the allegations in the complaint of its enforcement action.  The move marks a departure from the typical practice at the SEC… Continue Reading

Hurricanes, flash freezes and other disasters – plan and disclose accordingly or you may be hearing from the SEC

Posted in Disclosure Guidance

Almost 10 months since Superstorm Sandy caused widespread destruction to the northeastern U.S., an area not known for frequent hurricane activity, the people and businesses affected have still not fully recovered. As we now reenter the peak of hurricane season, businesses along the eastern seaboard are probably taking a closer look now than in years… Continue Reading

Uniform fiduciary standard for broker-dealers and investment advisers? Proceed with caution!

Posted in Financial Institutions

When managing investments and strategies for personal financial goals, retail investors often seek guidance from their investment advisers, and on an increasing basis, from their broker-dealers.  Broker-dealers and investment advisers are regulated extensively, but the regulatory requirements differ.  Broker-dealers and investment advisers are also subject to different standards under federal law when providing investment advice… Continue Reading

Will director compensation be the next target?

Posted in Compensation

Since 2007, executive compensation practices of public companies have been at the forefront of activist shareholders’ and shareholder rights groups’ agendas. Mandatory say-on-pay proposals, enhanced executive compensation disclosure, compensation committee and compensation consultant independence rules are just a few of the recent significant changes to the laws and regulations applicable to public companies in the… Continue Reading

Say-on-pay litigation: Round 2

Posted in Compensation

Why doesn’t the plaintiffs’ bar believe Congress means what it says? The Dodd-Frank Act could not have been more clear that the outcome of the mandatory say-on-pay advisory vote for public companies does not create or imply any change to the fiduciary duties of board members. However, as we have discussed in previous blog posts,… Continue Reading

When does hedging or pledging of company stock by insiders equate to bribery?

Posted in Corporate Governance

The answer: when ISS is evaluating a public company’s corporate governance under its revised policies for the 2013 proxy season. We previously blogged about the potential insider trading issues that could theoretically arise when insiders pledge company stock to secure loans. Now, with the implementation of the revised ISS governance standards, there are additional reasons… Continue Reading

Are investors’ interests served by proxy advisory firms?

Posted in Corporate Governance

As we say “goodbye” to 2012 we say “hello” to another proxy season full of angst caused by the self-appointed czars of corporate governance, the proxy advisory firms.  Although ISS and Glass Lewis have been making voting recommendations for more than a decade, over the past two years their power over voting outcomes has increased. … Continue Reading

GUEST BLOGGER: Lessons learned in corporate governance from the Jerry Sandusky tragedy

Posted in Corporate Governance

Mr. Lamm is Assistant General Counsel and Assistant Secretary at Pfizer Inc. and a Gunster alumnus.  The views expressed in this posting are Mr. Lamm’s personal views and should not be attributed to Pfizer Inc. or to Gunster. While nothing good has come out of the Jerry Sandusky sexual abuse scandal at Penn State, I… Continue Reading

Margin calls: The insider trading trap

Posted in Corporate Governance

Imagine the following scenario. Your company is publicly traded. As such, senior management is keenly aware of the potential for executives and employees trading in the company’s securities on the basis of material nonpublic information in violation of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and the infamous Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder. To prevent improper trading,… Continue Reading

Could directors be personally liable if Facebook paid too much for Instagram?

Posted in Corporate Governance

It is a basic tenant of corporate law that directors of a corporation are not liable for business decisions as long as the directors acted with a reasonable level of care in making these decisions. This is referred to as “the business judgment rule.” Because directors are not guarantors of corporate success, the business judgment… Continue Reading