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The Securities Edge Securities Blog for Middle-Market Companies

Monthly Archives: January 2015

In sickness and in health

Posted in Bob's Upticks, Disclosure Guidance

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase, is reputed to be a decisive person with a strong personality.  Of course, that shouldn’t be news to anyone who follows business or who knows what it takes to be CEO of a major company.  So it’s interesting that he recently said that he struggled with whether JPM should disclose that he was battling cancer.  (For the record, he seems to have won the battle.)

I’m not the only securities lawyer who’s had similar struggles when the CEO of a client has become seriously ill.  It’s a very challenging issue for several reasons.  First, there isn’t any rule – or even any literature (at least to my knowledge) – that tells us whether and what to disclose in this situation.  So when a client says, “show me the rule that says we have to disclose this,” there’s nothing to show.  Second, and more important, the issue pits the need to disclose against information that is quintessentially personal.  It’s also not just an issue between the executive and the company; often, the executive’s family and, possibly, his/her medical team and others are equally involved.  And even when there’s agreement to disclose, it’s very difficult to know what to say about the prognosis, if and when the executive can return to work, and so on.

I think JPM’s decision to disclose was the right one.  Among other things, JPM and Mr. Dimon are inextricably linked with each other; he is the public face of the company, and it’s hard to imagine mentioning one without the other.  In fact, it’s arguably this linkage that led to the defeat of shareholder proposals seeking to deprive Mr. Dimon of his title as Chairman of the Board; no one wanted to see if he would carry out his threat to leave the company if the proposals passed.  Second, his illness was grave and could have killed him.  In other words, it seems pretty clear that the information was market-moving – a factor that must be considered in making the disclosure decision.  (That said, contrast this with Apple’s treatment of Steve Jobs’s illness.)  Also, according to Mr. Dimon, he lost 35 pounds in his battle, making it painfully obvious that something was up.  So why hesitate to disclose something that everyone could see?

Another way of evaluating the matter is to consider whether there are any meritorious reasons not to disclose.  When I had to grapple with a similar decision, the facts were different; among other things, the CEO wasn’t the company’s alter ego, and it was questionable whether the stock would tank if we disclosed.  On the other hand, the company had just gotten past a nasty scandal and a period of intense upheaval in which two senior people had left and the company’s credibility had been shattered.  In these circumstances I couldn’t see a significant reason not to disclose.  I took some heat from the CEO’s family, but I had no doubt that I made the right decision.

Your thoughts?

Bob

Update to the JOBS Act? Probably not…

Posted in Disclosure Guidance

On January 14th, the House passed H.R. 37 “Promoting Job Creation and Reducing Small Business Burdens Act.”  Although passed with some support from the Democrats (29 votes, which in these days of hyper-partisanship is practically a bipartisan bill), the White House issued a veto threat on January 12th because the bill also delays part of… Continue Reading

Shock and awe at the SEC (and turning it into chicken salad)

Posted in Bob's Upticks, No-action letters, Proxy access, Shareholder proposals

Something shocking happened at the SEC yesterday.  SEC Chair Mary Jo White directed the SEC Staff to review its long-standing position on when a shareholder proposal conflicts with a company proposal and may be excluded from the proxy statement.  As a result, the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance withdrew a no-action letter that had given Whole Foods the green light to exclude a shareholder proposal on proxy access by including its own (less shareholder-friendly) proposal on the subject.  Corp Fin also said that it would not be issuing any additional no-action letters under the rule in question. It’s worth noting that these actions were taken at a sensitive time, as calendar-year companies approach peak proxy season and a major investor campaign is under way to impose proxy access upon companies that have been resisting it.

The SEC’s shareholder proposal rules are very complex, and I won’t go into details here.  However, as a general matter, the rules lay out the process by which eligible shareholders can submit proposals for inclusion in a company’s proxy statement.  Relevant here is that (1) the rules provide certain conditions under which a company can exclude a proposal and (2) companies can avail themselves of a “no-action” process to get the SEC’s permission to exclude a proposal if the conditions are satisfied.  It’s worth noting that the no-action process isn’t dispositive; the proponent or the company can take the matter to court, and there are usually a couple of cases each year in which that happens.

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Bob

The challenges in ‘refreshing’ board committees

Posted in Corporate Governance

Director “refreshment” has become a very hot topic in the governance community.  Investors increasingly are calling for replacing longer-serving board members with newer directors, possibly in order to achieve greater board diversity, possibly to get some fresh blood (or fresh thinking) on the board, or possibly to achieve other goals.  There is also increased talk… Continue Reading

Bad laws make hard cases

Posted in Bob's Upticks, Corporate Governance, Financial Institutions

There have been a number of press reports in recent days about attempts by the new Republican majority to repeal all or part of Dodd-Frank.  Depending upon whom you choose to believe (assuming you choose to believe anyone in the current political environment), the Republicans want to eviscerate it, and the Democrats refuse to change one word, or possibly even a punctuation mark.

The real problem with Dodd-Frank is that it’s a mixed bag – a mess, of course, but a mixed bag nonetheless.  My take on it is that there are some provisions that are reasonable and make sense; others go way too far; and still others don’t go far enough.  For example, the infamous (and, IMHO, ridiculous) provision requiring public companies to disclose the ratio of the CEO’s pay to that of the mean of all employees’ compensation.  On the other side, one wonders if the statute really did anything to regulate the financial services industry or if it did nothing more than exponentially increase the costs of compliance while leaving open the possibility that recent history (i.e., an economic collapse) could happen all over again for the same reasons.

What this suggests is that to make Dodd-Frank a good statute – assuming that’s possible – would require delicate surgery that would take time, careful thought and bipartisanship.  It may go without saying, but I’ll say it anyway – that isn’t going to happen in the current environment.  Grandstanding and blustery populist oratory seem to be the order of the day, and careful drafting isn’t even on the agenda.  (Of course, that was the case when the statute was being drafted – one of the scariest things I ever saw on a monitor was a live webcast of Barney Frank’s subcommittee hearing, when multi-page riders were waltzed in to the hearing room and voted upon before anyone could read them – much less debate them.)

I’m not sure where that leaves us, but wherever that is, it’s not a good place to be.

There it is.  I’d like to know what you think.

Bob

Bob’s top 10 books of 2014

Posted in Bob's Upticks

A few years ago, after I became Chair of the Securities Law Committee of the Society of Corporate Secretaries and Governance Professionals, I did something that I thought would be criticized – I posted a list of the top 10 books I’d read the prior year.  I thought I’d be criticized, not only because the topic had absolutely nothing to do with the Committee, but also because of my weird taste in reading. To my surprise, the posting generated a lot of positive responses (and no negative ones, to my recollection).  And so I decided make this an annual event.

From my humble perspective, 2014 was not a great year for reading. I read lots of books, but the good ones were few and far between.  The good news is that this made it easier for me to choose the 10 I liked the most.  BTW – note that these are books that I read in 2014, not necessarily books that were published during the year.  So here goes.

Fiction:

  • The Moor’s Account, by Laila Lalani – A novel based on an actual Spanish expedition to Florida in that failed, one of the few survivors a Moroccan slave who is the author of the account
  • The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd – Another historical novel about two sisters in Charleston who became abolitionists
  • An Officer and a Spy, by Robert Harris – Still a third historical novel based on the infamous Dreyfus affair in 19th Century Paris
  • The Wife, the Maid and the Mistress, by Ariel Lawhon – A delightfully atmospheric take on the disappearance of Judge Crater in Jazz Age New York
  • All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr – A serious historical novel about intersecting tragic lives in World War II; I didn’t love the ending, but it was a good read

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Bob